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5 Winter Driving Tips For Truckers

Winter is almost officially here. As a trucker, you are likely to run into slippery winter weather at some point this season. It’s important to remember these winter driving tips to keep everyone safe.

1. Slow Down

When roads are icy or snow covered (or have the potential to become icy) it is important to adjust your speed accordingly. High speeds and poor road conditions don’t mix. Keep everyone safe by reducing your speed this winter.

2. Maintain A Good Following Distance

A fully loaded semi trailer takes nearly two football fields in length to come to a complete stop in fair weather conditions. Add ice and snow to the mix and it can take even longer to come to a stop. Leave enough room between you and the vehicle in front of you to ensure you have enough room to slow down if needed.

3. Stock Up With Essential Supplies

If you have to stop due to poor weather conditions, you may need some supplies to stay safe. Make sure your truck is equipped with warm clothes, a coat, hat and gloves. Also make sure to have a flashlight, window scraper and a bag of salt in the truck. Remember to keep the gas tank full to ensure you’ll have enough fuel to reach a safe location if needed.

4. Don’t Drive Distracted

Distracted driving is a danger no matter what the road conditions are like, but it is even more of a concern during winter months. Keep both hands on the wheel at all times to make sure you are in control if you need to react quickly after hitting an ice patch on the road. Try not to fiddle with the radio or open up a snack when driving in poor weather. It is important to keep your full attention on the road when driving in winter weather.

5. Use Caution On Bridges

Bridges tend to freeze faster than other parts of the road. Be cautious when passing over a bridge if temperatures are dropping below freezing. Bridges may be slippery and ice can be difficult to detect.

Are you interested in learning more about trucking safety? Check out our other trucking tips blogs.

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